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Fish for Groups

IMG_0004This past Sunday, we held a meeting of the Young Adults Leadership teams that are part of the ministry at Sugar Creek Baptist Church. This is an annual pre-fall meeting where we discuss what’s been going on in our ministry area, what is coming, and then take some time to refine some aspect of our overall groups processes. We are incredibly blessed with strong lay leaders at Sugar Creek and, even with a few leaders missing, still have 52 in attendance for our luncheon.
One of the key parts of any healthy and growing ministry is the continued investment in leadership development through times of intentional training and a willingness to talk through basic ministry structures. As I’ve learned (often the hard way) those in ministry must remember two key principles:

1. We can never tell our people how much we love them.

2. We can never show our people how much they mean to us.

At Sugar Creek, we’ve found that many of our best leadership development times come on Sundays, often during or directly following our regular programming. So, this past Sunday, we held a lunch, catered by a wonderful vendor, that allowed our leadership to enjoy a great meal and then participate in some leadership discussions.

To facilitate the second part of this day, we used the powerful training resource called Fish! Philosophy and applied it to our groups ministry. I discovered the Fish! Philosophy while serving at a previous ministry venue and have seen the impact the four key principles can have in creating discussions to aid ministry development. The Fish! Philosophy uses a well produced video to discuss four principles that make any experience wonderful:Front Slide

1. Play

2. Make their Day

3. Be There

4. Choose Your Attitude

After showing the video, we had our groups, sitting together as a leadership team, to talk about how they could apply each in their groups. Perhaps most significant in any training time, especially with Millennials, is being sure to allow for mutual collaboration through conversation with their peers. To often we end up talking at people and not with them and this defeats the purpose of leadership training.

For any groups ministry, a consistent pattern of leadership development enables trust and provides a platform for continued health in these groups. If you are looking to start new groups, you can often find your leaders from times like these.

How we foster a culture of continued ministry leadership development is key to seeing health raised up in our churches and growth, not necessarily numerical, occur among our people. This is one example of how leadership development works well in an established church culture.

03
Sep 2014
POSTED BY Garet
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Leadership

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High Capacity Leaders and Low Lids

One of the best leadership books anyone can sit down and read is John Maxwell’s 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership. Maxwell’s timeless laws that are linked to real world examples provide a life-shaping read for leaders of any age.

law of the lidThe first law of the book is one that most people remember well, probably because it’s the first law: The Law of the Lid.

Essentially, this law is exactly what it sounds like, in every organization (business, government, church, non-profit, etc) lids exist that determine effectiveness. If someone has a low leadership lid, they’ll usually have low effectiveness. With a high lid, high effectiveness is possible.

For most organizations, when a leader with a high lid capacity is brought in, they can often be moved across different departments and divisions. Unsurprisingly, success follows them. Low lid leaders, however, stifle their departments and divisions. Jim Collins works out some key concepts related to this in Good to Great where he differentiates between different levels of leaders. If we understand both of these concepts together we can see that often, individuals down-line of differing leadership lids have varying results. Usually when a lack of productivity is combined with abnormally high turnover, there is an indication that a low lids is in place. This turnover is often created when a high level, or capacity, leader is forced to work under a low level leader.

In institutionalized organizations, one often finds high capacity leader working in a low lid situation. There are lots of reasons for this, often it is because as an organization becomes established it seeks out, or is allowed to keep, leaders that have more established patterns of service even if they have had falling results. Because of the maintenance mode that is inherent to an institutionalized organization, honest internal reviews and personnel audits are less frequent since the status quo is more important than creating and sustaining a dynamic workforce.

The short version: established organizations thrive off the status quo.

As a result, these organizations are able to hire young talent with higher than average leadership abilities because of the security and experience that can be gained working in that organization. These young leaders begin getting more and more experience and soon find themselves bumping up against their lids.

So, what keeps a high capacity leader in a low lid environment?

Often we see that a series of trade-offs exist. At first that trade-off might be the experience of working in a position and gaining insights beyond a university degree. Perhaps for someone seeking to break into a new industry, this translates to creating a pattern of consistency that is more attractive to future employers than a shiny new MBA or (for churches) MDiv. Other trade-offs could be, the ability to build a network of relationships that will advance one’s career in the future; time to finish off a degree or complete certain certifications; financial stability to create a better personal situation; being able to work around friends who might be likewise employed; being able to get office leavingthe “foot in the door” for an industry; and many others.

The reality is that for high capacity leaders, of any age but usually younger individuals, they will stay in a low leadership lid situation so long as the trade-offs outweigh the cost to their leadership ability.

Once the trade-offs diminish in value, or perceived value, and the opportunities for external advancement increase above the value of the trade-offs, the high capacity leader will leave their low lid environment. Though it happens, it is rare for high capacity leaders to stay in low lid situations for the long-term. True high capacity leaders have the impetus and calling to get beyond their lids and be challenged by high ceilings and bigger venues.

Established organizations can create a lot of success by leveraging the insights, abilities, and passions of new, high capacity leaders and, if they recognize how vital it is to champion the successes of those who move on, can earn higher credibility and performance in allowing these leaders to move on graciously.

26
Feb 2014
POSTED BY Garet
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Leadership

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Three Essential Staff Hires

One of the key challenges with any organization is finding and staffing the best talent. Churches are not unique among organizations even though they have different staffing needs. There are some essential positions that need to be filled and, for many churches, finding the right staff member for these positions can make or break a ministry area.

As I’ve been talking with other ministers and staffing professionals, we’ve noticed that there are three specific positions that are needed in churches. Maybe if we were to title this a bit more provocatively, we’d say they are the Three Fastest Growing Staff Positions.

In short, these three positions (possibly in order of need):

  1. Worship leader
  2. Children’s Minister
  3. Executive/Administrative Pastor

 

Now, what do we mean here? Well we’re first anticipating that the senior pastor position is filled. A church without a lead pastor (or at least lead communicator) needs to secure that position before anything else. The other three are essential to staffing a growing church.

Worship Leader – more than any other position on staff, the worship leader is of central importance. They are to be the lead worshippers, not superstars or rockstars, not showmen or entertainers. They have the unique calling to lead others into worship and set the tone for a worship service. The skill set required to accomplish that previous sentence is immense, and the calling from God must be just as immense. Yet for a quality, and qualified, worship leader, they are in short supply and great demand. As many of us have seen, the right worship leader can lead us into the holy places of God. The wrong worship leader (even if they have musical talent coming out the ears) can lead us into spiritual wilderness and rob of a church of its greatness. Finding a worship leader who understands they aren’t a rock star and can shoulder the burden of authentic leadership is difficult, but worth every moment of prayer, exploration, and interest.

Children’s Minister – there is nothing more precious in Jesus’ ministry than the children who sat before him and took in his teaching. As he noted in Matthew 19:14, child like faith typifies the earnestness with which we pursue to the Kingdom of God. Having a great children’s minister will help grow the faith of an entire church as the entire family is properly ministered to and reached with the Gospel. For many leaders in new churches, having a great children’s minister is more important than a student/youth pastor. For the one who is called and equipped to minister gently, firmly, and authentically to children and their parents, the pathway for ministry is great. Great children’s ministers understand that their ministry isn’t just to the littlest among us, but also to their parents. They have a platform for instruction unparalleled by almost any in the church, when they minister properly. Just like with worship leaders, children’s minister must be so cautious about their own lives and the lives of the adult volunteers they work with. Jesus words in Matthew 18:6 stand out as one principal text. Yet in the the right hands, a ministry to children grows a church from its youngest to its oldest members with deep roots of firmly planted families.

Executive Pastor – this also includes the administrative pastor role. So many senior pastors of churches have a deep passion for their people but lack the time, or perhaps skill set, to properly look after the daily ministry of a church. Having a quality executive pastor who understand their role is the same as the person who sits in the second chair of the orchestra can help a church and its staff grow and see seasons of faithfulness. Being a senior pastor necessitates involvement in the lives of attenders, members, and staffers. This kind of activity takes time and time devoted here draws away time from administrative and oversight tasks. The executive pastor position provides someone who can, when properly empowered and fully trusted, direct the staff, manage the facilities, align the strategy, and execute the vision at a level that permits the senior pastor to be true under-shepherd to the congregation. It is a challenging position because of the need for a great leader who is willing subordinate themselves publicly to the authority of a senior pastor and upholding the shared vision of the leadership team. This role also requires a refined skill set. Too often the executive pastor can draw their own limelight, but ultimately they must be willing to redirect everything to glorify God.

In all three of these growing staff positions, there are needed skills and even more needed calling. When a young seminarian asks about potential leadership avenues in a church, these are generally the three categories of staff positions I mention if they are uninterested in being a senior, or lead, pastor.

Though just hiring a great staff member won’t grow a church beyond that congregation’s trust in the leadership of the Holy Spirit, it can be a signal of the movement of the Spirit in their midst.

For each of these three positions, there is a growing number of churches looking for individuals who will fulfill these roles. Having great staff members who can impact those in our communities and churches provides a continued basis for growing and thriving churches. These three positions are key staffing positions also reflect the changing nature of ministry in the new century.

So, what staff positions are you looking at hiring? What are key positions in your church that go unfilled but are vitally needed?

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On the Southern Baptist Convention

Well it is that time of the year when we hear about the largest Protestant denomination in America, the Southern Baptist Convention.

The beginning of June marks the annual trek to a city by faithful Southern Baptists for the annual convention. This is a yearly assembly that takes place in differing locales for the purpose of voting on a budget…and a few other things. This week I’ll be focusing on some specific Southern Baptist issues, but initially I’ll quickly parse out some thoughts on my home denomination.

It is easy to go negative when talking about church stuff, or any stuff, because we are mired in a kind of cultural torpor that validates the bitingly negative opinion…that everyone has. So that isn’t my purpose. Instead I want to briefly talk about what I like about the SBC.

Often when I describe my affiliation to the SBC I begin by noting that “I’ve been a Southern Baptist since 9 months before I was born.” That is a true statement. I was raised by faithful Southern Baptist parents who served in Southern Baptist churches. My grandfather was a Southern Baptist pastor who, literally, built churches in Oklahoma and Michigan from the ground up. I’ve had a rich heritage of faithful people who have done their best to serve God and honor Jesus while being filled (but not too filled) with the Holy Spirit. Much of my theological formation happened in the cinderblock wall and tiled floors rooms of my home church; rooms that were separated by orange vinyl retractable room dividers. I accepted Jesus Christ as my personal Lord and Savior (with all the evangelical theology embedded in that statement) in the pastor’s study of that church on March 27, 1985.

I was (and will always be) an RA…that’s Royal Ambassador. My sister was a GA (Girl in Action) and, later, an Acteen. Missions was the embedded formation tool for our upbringing, and it made us stronger Christians.

The heart of the SBC has always been missions and ministry. We can look historically and note that the first two boards established by the founders of the SBC (who were a diverse theological lot) were the Home and Foreign Mission Boards. Southern Baptists continue to support missions with annual offerings and an intentional emphasis. We have a strong and well trained missionary force across the world bringing the Gospel to people and places far and wide.

Nationally, Southern Baptists have developed a tremendous Disaster Relief Ministry that goes right into damaged areas and provides basic needs (meals, shelter, and resources) that deploys thousands of volunteers at a higher and faster rate that state and national agencies. That is something to remember.

Our seminaries train and send out hundreds of new pastors and ministers every year and, because of the generous and ingenious support of the Cooperative Program, makes it affordable for the students. The seminaries have long been established as top tier theological institutions and have had the largest student bodies of most ATS schools in the United States.

Central to the SBC is that they are a people lashed to the Cross by the power of the Bible.

They are Gospel centered, Bible honoring denomination that seeks to condition their actions first by Scripture and then by application. The theological and spiritual formation lessons I gained growing up as a Southern Baptist were always rooted in the Scripture. This is something that has stayed with me through several stages of education.

There are many things about the SBC that make me proud to be part of the convention. It is a good group of earnest people that often are distorted for any number of reasons. As we move towards an era of marked post-denominational life, the SBC continues to see aspects of growth and continued commitment to their core beliefs and practices.

During their annual gala this week here in Houston, the SBC will likely take up motions and make declarations. Yet at the center of their daily activities will be constant prayer, fervent preaching, honest worship, and Gospel centered efforts.

For that I continue to be thankful. The Kingdom of God is larger because of the continued ministry and missions of Southern Baptists.

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