Resource Review: The Gospel Project

In my final “Ode to the SBC” post for this week I wanted to take a look at a curriculum piece published by their convention press, Lifeway. The Gospel Project is a new curriculum option for churches, regardless of denominational affiliation, which can be used for their groups ministries. Here is my review:

The Gospel Project

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Resource Name: The Gospel Project

URL: http://www.gospelproject.com

In a Sentence: A comprehensive curriculum that engages the meta-story of the Bible, the plan and process of salvation, through weekly Bible studies at all age levels.

Cost: about $4 for student books and $12 for leader guides, ebook options are available that reduce the costs.

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars, a solid curriculum option

Review

One of the things that Southern Baptists have always seemed to do well is develop comprehensive Bible study curriculum pieces that can be used in Sunday Schools, small groups, and other group ministry avenues. Though the groups materials have been comprehensive (several plans have you reading through the entire Bible in a non-lectionary 3 year plan) there have been some who desired a more rigorous curriculum that engages the broader story of the biblical narrative from Genesis to Revelation.

So, not too long ago a bold new piece was developed called The Gospel Project.

The Gospel Project (TGP) seeks to take participants on a three year journey through the themes of Scripture, keeping the Cross of Jesus Christ in plain view. This kind of Christocentric study is helpful as it reminds us that Christianity is, ultimately, defined by the person and work of Jesus Christ (1 Corinthians 2:2; 8:6; 2 Corinthians 5:20-21; etc.) Underlying the theological approach of TGP, the hermeneutical approach is to equip teachers/facilitators with a strong shovel and dig deep into the Scripture to talk about how we find Jesus in Scripture.

The approach is successful and TGP provides a fine resource for doing so. Each teacher guide is overflowing with exegesis, questions, historical quotes, theological discussion and other relevant data that equip the group leader beyond what might be necessary. So, in the preface the editors remind the group leaders to cut what they desire. One of my personal philosophies as I develop groups curriculum is to give teachers more than they need. It is always better to have more and cut away the rest than to be under prepared.

As TGP breaks out in different age ranges there are options for preschool, young kids, older kids, youth/students, and adults. This kind of comprehensive Bible study approach is important and not usually executed well. TGP brings this together well, though not perfectly, and provides a good platform for a church who want to journey through the Bible as a family.

The execution of the lessons plans is sound and through 13 week studies students are walked through theological discussions of the grand narrative of Scripture.

Questions are usually thoughtful and the examples/illustrations are helpful. One of the things that is provided at the end of each session in the leaders’ guide is a resource list. This probably could be more well rounded with other pastors, more diversity, and a broader reach into other media. Also, the 13 week curriculum cycle is fairly good though if you’re running an open group I’m not entirely sure how comfortable new participants might be showing up on week six or seven. Finally, it’s a Lifeway publication which does well to move away from some of the patterns often found in their curriculum, but it does keep its toes in some of the pedagogical patterns and that might backstop it from application outside Baptist churches. It shouldn’t but it might.

The curriculum is a solid piece and looks like it can be used across the evangelical spectrum in non-denominational or other denominational churches. My teachers, who have used it, have enjoyed it, though there is some need to soften the harder theological edges at times. All too often we hear clamoring about “substance, depth, and theology” from loud voices that are actually fewer in number than the rest of our churches. This is the kind of curriculum that provides grease for that squeaky wheel. However, if you’re not careful in the delivery the marginal, less mature believers who outnumber the others might get left behind (not eschatologically.)

I recommend The Gospel Project, especially for a deeper step and across the generational composition of your church.

One additional note

Recently TGP has gotten flack for being “Reformed” or “Calvinist” in its theology. Growing up at Calvary Baptist Church in Bel Air, Maryland I was taught that historically, Baptists (and Southern Baptist specifically) have appreciated reasonable diversity on theological perspectives. As I read through, and have used the TGP, I haven’t found a heavy handed Reformed or Calvinist perspective preached.

Now, many people on the board of advisors and some of the authors are admittedly Reformed. So it probably didn’t help the editors’ case that this is a general curriculum if one only looks at the first couple of pages of the first leaders’ guide. However, I don’t find an overwhelming Reformed or Calvinist perspective in the Gospel Project. There is a Reformed perspective, but there are other perspectives that are fully within the evangelical theological perspective.

As a PhD candidate in his final stages of program work, I have read a plethora of theological works and approaches. As I was trained at my undergraduate and seminary levels, I encountered perspectives from the wide range of theological positions. I am not Reformed. I am not a Calvinist. I love my Reformed and Calvinist brothers and sisters in Christ. I value their input. I am thankful for their passion. I love their commitment to Christ.

The Gospel Project isn’t a deeply Reformed or Calvinist work. It is safe for Southern Baptist in particular to use as it looks to elevate and proclaim Christ. Just a quick note.